Saturday, March 17, 2012

No Sweat - About Baking Soda Deodorant

Welcome to the fourth in this mini series about deodorants and what makes them tick. I have had some great input and a couple of questions from you guys that put me on an information excursion about a popular ingredient in many DIY deodorants: sodium bicarbonate (also known as bicarbonate of soda or baking soda).

Baking soda deodorant is a fairly simple melt and mix recipe that can be found on many forums and blogs about DIY beauty. The recipe – in broad strokes – baking soda is mixed with coconut oil and/or shea butter, cornstarch and/or arrowroot and optional essential oils. Proportions vary slightly, but the basic idea is the same.

Baking Soda is Good For a Slew of Things
Sodium bicarbonate is a pretty versatile ingredient. Because it is amphoteric (reacts with both acids and bases), it has numerous uses. It is at hand in almost every laboratory and found in almost every kitchen. Taken internally, it functions as an antiacid.  Mixed with water and applied as a paste, it helps reduce itchiness from insect bites or poison ivy. This same paste functions as an effective cleaning and scrubbing agent for kitchen and bathroom surfaces. Bicarbonate soda helps control fungus growth and is a known absorbant of musty smells (as many a used-book salesperson will happily tell you). It's understandable that this multifunctional ingredient would be an obvious choice as the active in a homemade deodorant. It is quite an effective deodorizer.

So What's the Problem?
The problem is that baking soda causes some level of increased sensitivity in the skin of most users after a short period of time. I've read numerous accounts of 'burning sensation', rash, flaking and even 'skin going leathery'. Sodium bicarbonate's MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheet) does indeed warn that 'continuous contact may cause skin irritation (red, dry, cracked skin).' (See one MSDS example here.)

Mind you, not everyone gets these skin reactions. I've also seen accounts of people that were thrilled with how well their baking soda deodorant worked and had no complaints. But in all fairness, these folks belong to a minority.

Skin reactions or not – no one seems happy about applying baking soda deodorant directly after shaving.

I think I know why.

A Question of Balance 
Among its many uses, sodium bicarbionate is used for effectively raising the pH balance of water.

Baking soda has an average pH of 8.3.

If you check the label of any skin care product that advertises being 'tolerated by even the most sensitive skins', you will find a pH between 5.0 and 5.5. If you check the pH of many deodorants, you will often find it lies somewhere between 4.5 and 5.0.

Aloe Vera – which is so skin friendly it is even recommended for toddlers – has a pH of approx 4.5.

Even though it is an effective deodorizer, sodium bicarbonate is unfortunately on the harsh side of skin friendly.

LisaLise Armpit Requirements
When I started developing my own deodorants, one of my main requirements (apart from the obvious deodorizing one) was that they could be applied directly after shaving with no irritation or sensitivity of any kind. I succeeded. For this reason alone, I do believe I am quite happy to abstain from giving baking soda deodorant a try.

I must admit though, I have a certain admiration for the ladies and gents that are able to use baking soda deodorant without experiencing any sensitivity. What hardy stuff they must be made of!

UPDATE: Are you experiencing a skin reaction from your DIY baking soda deodorant? Please read this post.

Are you interested in trying a DIY baking soda-free deodorant recipe with easily obtainable ingredients? Please visit this post

Do Tell
Do you make your own baking soda deodorant? How long do you have to wait after shaving before you can apply deodorant?

More About Deodorant
About Aluminum and Antiperspirants
About Lemon Ester
About Potassium Alum
Apologies to Potassium Alum
The Basic Make-up of a Deodorant
How Does Deodorant Work?

Visit the Deodorant FAQ Page

53 comments:

Ariane said...

I do use my own homemade baking soda deodorant, but it does cause a rash.I think the problem was that I used too much.Everyone else in my family uses it with no problems though. Do you have a good recipe without baking soda?

Debbie said...

I get the red, leathery armpits from baking soda, however, it has never hurt. It looks like it would be super painful but there is no pain. My pits will be bright red for a couple days, then dark red a few days, then brown a few days, then peel for a day or two. Repeat. I put the deodorant on directly after shaving, no pain. My pits are horrible looking but I reek otherwise. I have even cut the baking soda in half using cornstarch for the other half and it still happens. I don't know what I'll do come summer when pits are on display!

Lise M Andersen said...

@ Ariane - Thanks for sharing! I think no matter how little you use, the baking soda is going to give you a rash. Here's a recipe without baking soda, courtesy of Crunchy Betty:
1-1/2 Tbsp grated beeswax or beeswax beads
4 Tbsp coconut oil
1 Tbsp shea butter
4 tsp clay (bentonite or other)
20-25 drops essential oil (tea tree, rosemary, lavender, lemon, bergamot, or a mixture of any listed)
Empty, clean, sterilized deodorant container

Melt the beeswax and coconut oil on very low heat, whisking often. Once melted, add in the shea butter and whisk a few times, then remove from the heat and continue melting. After that’s melted and you have a liquid, sprinkle in the clay and continue to whisk well until everything is combined. Drop in the essential oil, whisking still. Place the pan into a cool water bath, and leave for 5 minutes or until it just begins to set up. Spoon the mixture into your deodorant container and place it in the freezer for 20-30 minutes (or until completely hard). If, for some reason, it starts to get too soft on a hot day, just put it back in the freezer for a while.
........................

Note: I haven't tried this recipe, but it may very well work. There are no ingredients that should irritate the skin other than some essential oils. I would probably use lavender and/or tea tree if I were making this for myself to be as 'sensitive skin friendly' as possible.

@ Debbie - wow! It sounds like you are getting a bit of a raw deal from the baking soda. I'm totally impressed that you can apply right after shaving - also that you are pain free, although I must admit I don't envy you the discoloration and leathery-ness. Perhaps Crunchy Bettys recipe above is worth a whirl...

Debbie said...

Thanks for sharing that recipe from Crunchy Betty! I will give it a whirl soon. :)

Lise M Andersen said...

I hope it works for you and would love to hear how it goes. :)

- said...

Hmm... I use the Crunchy Betty original deodorant - corn start, baking soda, and coconut oil.

I've been using it for a year now (!!!). For the first three weeks, I had nasty, leathery skin, and it hurt when I applied right after shaving.

After those three weeks, though, things were fine! I can use my deodorant right after shaving, and I haven't had bumps/rashes/pain ever since. I attributed the leathery skin as detoxing from the superhighpowered antiperspirant that I was using before!

- K said...

Hmm... I use the Crunchy Betty original deodorant - corn start, baking soda, and coconut oil.

I've been using it for a year now (!!!). For the first three weeks, I had nasty, leathery skin, and it hurt when I applied right after shaving.

After those three weeks, though, things were fine! I can use my deodorant right after shaving, and I haven't had bumps/rashes/pain ever since. I attributed the leathery skin as detoxing from the superhighpowered antiperspirant that I was using before!

Lise M Andersen said...

Hey there K. Wow, you are one of a very few I think. I have read mostly (but not all) bad news from folks using baking soda deodorants. It's pretty impressive that you 'got through' the rash period and came out on the other side and can continue to use it with no rash.
I'm would imagine the reaction you had in the beginning was not a detox effect, but a reaction to the baking soda, although I understand your wanting to blame the antiperspirant. Some can have some pretty 'serious' actives-- I've got a post upcoming on antiperspirants in this mini-series.

Anonymous said...

My homemade deodorant has turned my pits brown! Help?!? I love it works great but my skin looks not so pretty! Anyone know why or how to fix this problem? Thanks :)

Lise M Andersen said...

Hi Anonymous - it sounds very much to me like the discoloration is due to the baking soda. Did you have a period with a rash as well, or did it just discolor the armpits?

If you switch to a baking-soda-free deodorant, I'm guessing you will see the discoloration fade.

Check the DIY deodorant recipe a few comments up. I'd love to hear how it goes for you if you decide to try it.
Good luck!

Anonymous said...

I never had a rash but i do get a little itchy sometimes. I will try something with out or with less BS i used equal parts bs and cs. Thanks for answering.

Lise M Andersen said...

Hi Anonymous - do let me know how it goes!

Anonymous said...

I have used to baking soda, coconut oil, cornstarch deo since January and I have had no issues with it. That being said...I have also switched my shaving method and use an electric razor almost daily on my pits. Mainly because I would get red bumps even with a brand new razor. I do still use a razor if I'm going out somewhere and have on a strappy dress to tank but I do wait a while to put the deo on after shaving.

Jamie

Lise M Andersen said...

Hi Jamie - Thanks for sharing! I'm guessing you are using your own homemade deodorant? I know what you mean about the red bumps. I'm curious as to how/when you shave? I would imagine using an electric razor could result in quite a bit of 'drag' that could cause irritation if there is the slightest moisture on the skin. I'd love hearing a bit about your electrical-shaving-method.

Michele said...

HI I tried the Crunchy betty recipe with the butters and it didn't keep the odors away. I would say it lasted 3 hours during the winter.

I like the baking soda one. I do have a faint odor by morning but nothing a shower can't fix. I did have some read bumps but when I cut back the tea tree oil they went away. I also use less baking soda than recommended in any recipe I have seen b/c of the comments of a rash. I just play with the recipe until it works for me.

Anonymous said...

Yes, I do use the homemade deo (coconut oil, cornstarch or arrow root and baking soda).

I have a Panasonic rechargeable razor (almost 8 yrs. old), and yes, the pits must be dry so I try to shave first thing in the morning BEFORE I start running around and cleaning but if you have damp pits a little cornstarch works great and no drag. Just make sure to clean the razor afterwards or you end up with little white clumps stuck in the razor. Eww! Honestly, it works great and it's a pretty darn clean shave...and I have no more red bumps. :D

I have to shave pretty much daily. That's why I decided to give this electric razor thing a shot and so far it's working perfectly.

Jamie

Lise M Andersen said...

Hey Jamie - Thanks so much for sharing! Of course - it makes perfect sense to shave PRE sweating/bathing etc, and the tip about powdering the pits is great too!

Lise M Andersen said...

@Michele - Thanks so much for sharing. I'm sorry to hear the Crunchy Betty recipe didn't work for you. Have you ever tried a straight up deodorant crystal? Just curious to hear if this worked for you...

Anonymous said...

Just made my first homemade deodorant yesterday. And so far day one it really works a little burning sensation when I first put it on but I think I used either too much baking soda or tea tree oil. I can't really wear commercial deodorant it just makes me stink and natural deodorant it doesn't work at all. Making homade deodorant is easy worth trying I think.

Lise M Andersen said...

Hey there Anonymous,
If you are experiencing a burning sensation I'm willing to bet it is the baking soda that is doing the damage. Have you ever tried those 'natural crystal deodorants'? It looks like a piece of 'rock' that is semi-see through. There is no added scent and you just wet it to apply. Might be worth giving a try? (Or maybe those are the ones you've tried and are calling natural deodorant). If so, then this wasn't much of a suggestion...

Shelly said...

Great post! I too recently made a homemade deodorant with cornstarch, coconut oil and baking soda. It worked great for odor control etc but it caused itching and a slight rash- more so than store bought deodorants! I figured it was the baking soda so I remixed with 1/2 the amount of baking soda and more cornstarch but it´s still irritating - bummer :-)

Lise M Andersen said...

Thanks for your kind words Shelly! Sorry to hear that you had the rash problem as well. It's more common than not I'm afraid. You may have more luck with the natural deodorant crystals (potassium alum) mentioned in my comment above. :)

Anonymous said...

I tried so many variations of baking soda deo, and I always eventually break out in massive Flaming red leather pits. :( I am currently using a mix of witch hazel, veggie glycerin, with some tea tree and patchouli in a roll on container. It works well, but I prefer a cream because I have to reapply this one often and on top of normal sweat, my pitts are always damp from the deo. I haven't used arrowroot yet, so my next deo will be Shea, coconut oil, arrow root and essential oils. I'm going to stop using BS altogether to see if the odor can be controlled without it. I'm a petite lady, and I don't sweat a lot, but I have major odor due to excess male hormone (pcos).

Lise M Andersen said...

Hi Anonymous - this is great input. I really hope you have luck with the odor control - it really is the most uncomfortable part of all - more so than sweat. Have you tried natural deodorant crystals? These work very well for me. They are water soluble, so they may just work in your gel base... just a thought.

lint said...

I have tried so many deodorant methods :( Ever since puberty, my pits have been disgusting.

Normal deodorant of any brand would work for a few weeks, then quit. I decided I'd had it with the aluminum in deodorant as it never did anything for sweat on me anyway, and I moved onto men's deodorant. They worked for a lot longer (except I smelled manly), but then they quit, too.

I've tried the salt crystal which NEVER worked at all, lots of natural retail deodorants (A&H, Tom's, Hugo, Desert Essense, Nature's Gate) with limited or no effect, several combinations of EO's (no), straight coconut oil (made stank worse!), witch hazel (instantaneous rash), lemon juice (serious rash after a few weeks), alcohol in a spray bottle (worked for a few weeks, then it stopped working), the crunchy betty deodorant with clay that was mentioned above (did not work at all, and the material cost was steep)...

So more recently (2 weeks ago?) I mixed up a corn starch/baking soda and coconut oil concoction. I added a little bit of aloe vera and jasmine essence for more liquid and less oil usage. It definitely keeps me from reeking! I had some white mess clumps, but I decided it was better than smelling like a big bag of rotting onions in the sun. Then a couple days ago it happened: my skin got dark, bumpy, and leathery. It doesn't hurt, but it's really ugly and obvious :/ I don't know, it's a bummer no matter how you look at it. I will probably try making a new batch with a lot less baking soda and see what happens. Why can't just one of these natural deodorants work so I can spend this significant chunk of my life worrying about something else?

Lise M Andersen said...

Hey there Lint - Thanks so much for sharing. Wow, you have had a long hard struggle. I fear you are going to have probs with irritation - even if you lower the baking soda amount in your next deodorant.

I'm trying to think if there is anything I can suggest that you haven't tried, but it really sounds like you have been the 'whole route'. There seems to be some indication that you 'work best with variety' though, so maybe it would be possible to make a selection of workable solutions for yourself by concentrating on the ingredients that seem to work the longest for you and combining them in various ways, then switching every week or so.

One thing you do have to be very mindful of is bacterial growth with anything you mix together that contains liquids (this includes aloe vera). If you don't want to use preservatives, be sure and use your mixture within a very few days and store it in the fridge. It would be disasterous to add insult to injury by introducing unwanted bacteria to this already sensitive area.

I wish you the very best of luck with your endeavours.

Anonymous said...

Just wondering why you use potassium allum in your products. I thought potassium alum was related to aluminium ... a big no-go area for people who wish to apply safe products to their skin.

Lise M Andersen said...

Hey there Anonymous - Potassium alum is not amongst the 'no-go' ingredients. It is quite safe to use. For a bit more detailed info, please check out this post about aluminum and deodorants (part of this mini series about deodorants) http://www.lisaliseblog.com/2012/06/no-sweat-about-aluminium-and.html
and this one about potassium alum
(also part of this series) http://www.lisaliseblog.com/2012/02/no-sweat-potassium-alum.html
Feel free to drop another comment if you have additional questions. :)

Anonymous said...

Please becareful doing this – I tried it and yes it worked, but a few days later I broke out in boils, alot of boils. The bicarb obviously irrated my skin big time. Since then I have spent 6 months in and out of hospital with intravenous antibiotics and surgery (twice!) because of a subsequent MRSA skin infection. Finally after 3 months taking a high-dose combination of two different oral antibiotics, I seem to be in the clear and will never, ever try DIY deodorant again…

Lise M Andersen said...

Hi there Anonymous - Oh my goodness you've had the absolute worst reaction I've ever heard of to baking soda deodorant! You poor thing! What a horrible thing to go through. :(

Anonymous said...

http://foodtoglow.wordpress.com/2011/09/02/a-homemade-deodorant-that-really-works/

Lise M Andersen said...

Hey there anonymous. Thanks for the link. An interesting read and good looking DIY deodorant recipe to be sure. :)

Anonymous said...

Debbie, I had the same problem at first. I have very sensitive skin and figured I would have to find another solution. Then a friend suggested that I rub a couple drops of almond oil in to my pits before applying the baking soda. I was sceptical at first, but found that this solved all my issues. Plus it gave the baking soda something to stick to. I've been doing this for a year now and haven't had an issue since. I stay fresh all day (can't say the same for "traditional" deodorant). Hope this helps you out.

Anonymous said...

The dark red leathery reaction from using baking soda is most likely a fungal infection. The baking soda changes the PH of your skin under your arm and affects the bacteria that normally keep the naturally occuring fungii in check. Without the bacteria the fungii take over and the infection spreads very quickly. Most likely it is a type of yeast infection. A yeast infection is counteracted by vinegar, but beware, vinegar and baking soda react together as an acid and a base.

Lise M Andersen said...

Hi Anonymous - I'm having a hard time agreeing with you. I think a better solution all around to having a rash or any kind of skin reaction to DIY baking soda deodorant is to find an alternative deodorant.

Anonymous said...

I agree that with such a reaction it is better to find an alternate deodorant. People should understand though that the resulting rash is most likely a fungal infection and not a reaction to a chemical irritant. Sodium bicarbonate changes the PH of the underarm area which effectively limits the BO producing bacteria, but has the unfortunate side effect of allowing fungi to thrive. In the majority of people this is the candida albicans fungus that can be treated with certain fungicides like the active ingredient in Lotrimin. But to assume it is just an irritation and leave it untreated result in a rash that spreads or lasts for weeks or months.

It is no wonder the industry does not offer an effective over the counter deodorant because the only effective way is to kill the bacteria that produces BO, and the result is that fungi and other infections can spread in the absence of this bacteria. So the industry only offers neutral solutions, like aluminum-based deodorants, which are marginally effective at controlling wetness but do nothing to kill the BO-causing bacteria; and they offer strong-scented products to mask the smell, which we all know is ineffective as well, and offensive in its own way.

Lise M Andersen said...

hi anonymous
Candida albicans is usually occuring in moister environs such as the oral or genital regions. I've never heard of this in the underarm area. Find more info on this here: http://m.netdoctor.co.uk/diseases/facts/candidaalbicans.htm

As to your comments on whether or not the industry offers useful and functioning deodorants to stop body odor, I'm not sure I can agree with you here either. I think the main complaint people have with industry made deodorants is their content of certain specific ingredients (like aluminum) that have been targeted by scaremongers. Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying industry made deodorants are perfect (if I thought that, I wouldn't have spent so many years developing my own), but I'm pretty sure they are overall effective at deodorizing.

Anonymous said...

Candida is naturally-occurring in the armpit, though more commonly identified in the groin area and as a result an underarm rash is often mis-diagnosed as an abrasion rash (due to shaving) or a reaction to a certain chemical in a deodorant. What happens with baking soda is that the higher pH of the chemical tends to remove the acid sheath (low pH) on the surface of the skin and it kills the bacteria that keeps the fungi in check. This commonly results in cutaneous candidiasis, which is the rapid spread of the candida fungus on the underarm. Telltale signs of a candida albicans infection of the underarm include: dark red leathery or velvety area, defined border of small bumps and possibly larger lesions; rash scales over significantly after a few days; itch comes in waves and can be severe on the level of chicken pox or poison ivy; excessive flaking off of skin which can result in wound-type small areas that "weep"; an unusual smell that is different from your typical BO; once the rash clears and heals (typically a couple of weeks with anti fungal treatment) the skin remains brownish for up to 4-6 weeks. To treat and prevent recurrence you should eliminate the fungi, stop using products which change the pH of your skin, take care to avoid irritation and treat any skin breaks to avoid a secondary bacterial infection. Clotrimazole (the active ingredient in Lotrimin) is an effective anti-fungal and usually relatively mild on the skin. Vinegar also is effective though can be irritating to sensitive skin and you smell like a salad bar. Cortisone creams can be effective for itch. Loose clothing will allow the rash to heal more quickly. Try not to scratch hard as the sensitive skin, especially around the edges, can break easily. The rash can spread to other parts of the body, in particular the groin. Typically showering will spread the fungi as soap and water does not effectively kill fungi. You should act quickly to treat and prevent its spread as if left untreated and your immune system does not naturally control it, it can spread internally as well and cause significant complications. Baking soda is an effective deodorant, but unfortunately has more serious side effects in the majority of people. The rash descriptions here and in other similar threads are representative of this fungal infection.

Lise M Andersen said...

HI Anonyomous - thanks for your input. It looks like I have a bit of research to do on candida. You may have just inspired a new blog post.

Anonymous said...

I use a mix of baking soda and bath powder. I love the result as far as no BO, but like some others my underarm has turned black. I have no rash or redness. Also, the underarm where I have had radiation for breast cancer, has not turned dark, but neither does it sweat or smell. If I could find a cure for the dark underarm and keep the no BO, I would be a happy camper!

Lise M Andersen said...

Thanks for sharing! It's great that you are BO free, but I can imagine the miscolored armpit is less than fun... Have you ever tried the deodorant stones? (potassium alum) also called natural deodorant crystal? This works very well for me (no BO) and there is no miscoloration from using this product.. maybe worth a try?

Dragon Li said...

I used to use the baking soda/cornstarch mix for YEARS, talking easily 10 years if not more. After having my son, perhaps a year went by and I suddenly could no longer tolerate the baking soda. I was getting major burning rashes that I had NEVER experienced before. In desperation, I tried going back to regular chemical deodorants but I began burning from those too. I think there's some sort of body chemistry involved as to how well you can tolerate the baking soda. Like I said, for years, then boom. Now I'm forced to use a liquid mineral salt concoction that leaves me smelling awful (instead of putrid as when I use nothing). I add the cornstarch when it's dry to minimize friction rashes and reduce some of the perspiration/smell. It's serviceable, but I don't lift my arms too often in public anymore :(

Lise M Andersen said...

HI Dragon Li, thanks for sharing this. It's a very interesting story! I'm sorry you are struggling with finding a workable deodorant solution. My pinterest board has a home made baking soda free deodorant recipe (that someone else developed and I admit I haven't tried yet). Maybe worth having a look? Here's a link http://pinterest.com/llcph/diy-beauty/

Lauralynn Elliott said...

I've been getting the rash, too. I'm wondering how it would work if I used a little more arrowroot and leave out the baking soda? Do you know what the arrowroot actually contributes to the mix?

Lise M Andersen said...

Hey there LauraLynn,

I'm thinking it might be a good idea to try. Check the comment above with a link to a deodorant recipe. This is one that will not irritate, and may very well work. (I haven't tried it myself, but did check out the ingredients). You might also try the deodorant crystal stone (potassium alum). This works very well and doesn't irritate the skin. It is even used for shaving cuts, so won't sting at all. Hope this was of help!

Kiatrisse said...

Hi! I am so happy I found this blog yesterday. A friend commented about her use of Baking Soda as a deodorant. I was curious and began using it although previously the Crystal deodorant was working just fine. I was amazed at how much better the Baking Soda worked. It's the best deodorant ever, absolutely NO odor at all! And then I began noticing redness on my underarms. I googled this and found that I was probably detoxing and my skin was getting used to the Baking Soda, so I continued to use it. Yesterday I noticed darkness, irritation, burning sensation and itching under my arms. Since Baking Soda deodorant is new for me, I figured that must be the culprit. I decided to google Baking Soda deodorant, rash, irritation, etc. That's when I found your amazing blog! Yesterday morning was the last time I used Baking Soda under my arms. I've since only applied A&D ointment, Organic Aloe Vera and Organic Coconut oil to my underarms to allow them to heal. From reading one of the comments on this blog, I may have to try Lotrimin also. Anyway, I've used no deodorant at all for now. And so far I haven't really even needed it. I'm just a fanatic and hate all body odor. Thankfully I didn't use the Baking Soda on any other body parts! The itching has stopped although the slight burning sensation continues. Looks like I'll be returning to my Crystal deodorant. Thanks so much for your informative post.
Mercedes

Lise M Andersen said...

HI Kiatrisse, Thanks for your friendly words. I'm so glad this was helpful to you. It sounds like you have pinpointed the culprit in time and hopefully your armpits will heal quickly.

Anonymous said...

I hate the stains on clothing from commercial deoderants. They also did not always keep the smell at bay. I have used the "crystals" in the past. They work if I do not get too sweaty. The baking soda works better for me. For a couple of years, I have used baking soda with skin lotion as a deodorant. I am a man and do not shave my pits. I tried using just baking soda, but it got too itchy. I put on a bit of hand/body lotion. Then I dip three fingers in the baking soda and gently rub in. I have never experienced more than a couple of small, red spots. When the itch gets annoying, I use aloe or even sometimes a little hydrocortisone cream. I have never experienced the awful infections mentioned above, thank goodness. My method takes much less work, though it has gotten a strange look when visiting a friend or family member overnight. :-)

Lise M Andersen said...

Hi Anon - thanks for your input. I'm glad this is working for you, but please do note that some people can use baking soda for a very long time before seeing a reaction.

Julianna Frazier said...

I have a rash too. I'll discontinue using baking soda immediately, get some ointment, and find an alternative way to keep BO down. I'm upset because my deodorant smelled wonderful and I took a lot of pride in making something myself. Now I have to start all over again :(

Lise M Andersen said...

Hi Julianna - So sorry to hear you have had a rash! Depending on how bad it is, you might try soothing the skin with pure aloe vera and going deodorant free for a short period of time. Have you tried the deodorant crystal? I have an upcoming post on how to use this most effectively. This is great even for senstive skin and will most definitely keep BO at bay. I have very sensitive pits myself and have had good results all around with the stone deodorant.
Let me know how it goes, ok?

Anonymous said...

Would the baking soda work all day even if I sweat a bunch under my arms or would It not work please help

Lise M Andersen said...

Hi Anon - baking soda is an effective deodorizer, so it will work as such - even if you sweat a lot. Be aware that it messes with the pH of your skin and causes irritation after you have been using it for a while. There are a few people who don't react to it, but i would proceed with caution-- take it in VERY small doses to test how you react to it. Good luck