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Monday, March 26, 2012

Falling For The Wrong Type - Carbomer

Forgive me, but I've fallen a teensy bit in love. I tried not to. I tried to stay away, but I was wooed. I was ambushed!

My initial introduction was a no-fail aloe vera gel that magically outdistanced all the others I had ever used. It had the perfect texture – light, yet firm. The perfect behavior – it went on smooth, melted in and simply disappeared with no tackiness or residue. It was almost too good to be true.

It was too good to be true.

The Bursting of The Bubble
After discovering it was carbomer that was responsible for (almost) everything I had fallen for in this particular gel, I looked elsewhere for the same properties – diligently. Before long I found myself comparing every other thickener/gelling agent/texturizer to it.

Sigh.

Carbomer is not plant based. It's not even animal based.

Here comes the shocker.

It's ... petro-chemical based.



But Maybe There's a Touch of Plant Something in There Somewhere... Right?
Not even close, I'm afraid. Carbomer is a generic name for 'synthetic high molecular weight polymers of acrylic acid commonly used as thickening, dispersing and emulsifying agents in pharmaceuticals and cosmetics' (see more at Wikipedia here). In short, it probably couldn't be any further from plants or plant-based materials.

Then There Must be Dangers, Warnings and Other Bad News... Right?
I tried, but couldn't find a thing. Carbomer is actually one of a very few petro-chemical based ingredients that I am unable to find any dangers, warnings, or even environmentally-worrying facts about – at all. Even the hard-core green sites can't find anything bad to say about carbomer.

Why No One is Complaining About it
Carbomer won't cause irritation or allergic reactions – even if a product contains up to 100% of the stuff.

CosmeticsInfo.Org says
"Clinical studies with Carbomers showed that these polymers have low potential for skin irritation and sensitization at concentrations up to 100%. A carbomer polymer demonstrated low potential for phototoxicity and photo-contact allergenicity."

Carbomer is, in fact, so departed from nature that nature can hardly figure out what it's dealing with, so chooses to ignore it completely.

Cosmetics Scientist Colin Sanders says 
"The chemistry of carbomer is totally synthetic and bears no relationship to anything in nature. This is a good thing. It means that your immune system has not encountered anything similar in its evolutionary history and so it is unlikely to react to it. There are millions of people in the world of course, and I dare say there are some of them somewhere who do react to carbomer. Whatever you use there is somebody somewhere who will react to it. But I have never come across or heard of a reaction to this particular material."
(Read his entire post on carbomer here.)

Knowing all of these incredibly positive things about carbomer, a person could be tempted to make an exception to their stubborn plant-based rules and just give in and embrace this wonder ingredient, but ...

There May Just be a Plant-Based Alternative After All
I recently found a new gelling agent/thickener that is plant-based and advertised by my supplier as 'having qualities like carbomer' (nice to see I'm not the only one comparing gelling agents and thickeners to carbomer). I am in the process of testing this new ingredient and promise to update soon.

Meantime, even though carbomer did sneak its way in through the back door, I've decided not to be mad at it for not being plant based. How can you be mad at something that nature can't even be bothered about?

29 comments:

  1. Altså Halåååå - må jeg lige sige noget her?

    Lise. Er der ikke noget med, at petrokemi er basert på råolie? Og så vidt jeg er informeret, så er olie "lavet af" meget meget meget meget meget gamle planter. Jaaa, se det er jo plantebaseret. Så er den reddet ;-)

    Kh Rikke

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  2. yes ma'am- man er da helt og aldeles forelsket i din logik! Bravo! Tihi!

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  3. Hi Lise
    Do you have an update about the plant-based carbomer-like thickening agent? Thanks!

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  4. Hi Ser - yes! Please do a search for konjac glucomannan on this blog - I did several posts on this gelling agent as it was advertised as being an alternative to carbomer.

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  5. Thank you for your reply and for the info. Very useful!

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  6. You can be allergic to carbomers. I am. Found this out after skin testing from my dermatologist. Expisure causes rases ans,d eczema.

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  7. Hey there Anon - thanks for sharing this. Since it is very rare to find persons who react to carbomers, I imagine you are among a very select few. I wish you all the best.

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  8. I was just researching more on carbomer.I was using moisture drops for dry eye and my eyelids became swollen and eyes burning, allergic reaction. Dr had to put me on cortisol drops for 2 wks,Then I was prescribed Restassis which they said would burn a little when I first put drops in. Burning was all day long and went back to Dr after I found the inactive ingredient was Carbopal 980.Realized it was the Carbopol which is related to the carbomer polymer.I found moisture gel drops that don't have it and is preservative free and no problem. Now I know why some moisture lotions give me eczema on my hands and am in the process of finding new eye makeup too without polymers. I'm sure there are more people that don't know why they have irritation at times.Check for co-polymers

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    1. hi...tell me what this product is...that doesn't contain this carbo..?

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  9. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  10. Hey there Ser - Thanks so much for getting back with this additional info - you've given me something to research!

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  11. Even petrol came originally from organic substances. Just like not everything organic is safe, maybe not everything inorganic is unsafe.

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  12. I believe I am allergic as well... so not that rare to be allergic

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  13. Hey there laughing spider - the product is konjac glucomannen. I've done several posts on it while I was testing it-- try using the search field on the blog to see several posts about how it compares with carbomer

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  14. Have been researching this ingredient because of an allergy to rubber accelerators. It's in one of my products that claim to be petrolatum free. It sounds so much like carba mix that I'm afraid to use it. This information has helped me a lot! If the plant based version was used, it would be listed as the actual name you mentioned and not as Carbomer right?

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    1. Hi unknown -- the plant based version I worked with that came close to functioning as well as carbomer was konjac glucomannan

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  15. I have tried HEC that gives the same crystal clear look that I liked. However the only set back is it is gluey and sticky. I have been trying to neutralize that without success. Just wondering if Konjac will give a clear look and has the same feel as Carbomer?

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  16. I have tried HEC that gives the same crystal clear look that I liked. However the only set back is it is gluey and sticky. I have been trying to neutralize that without success. Just wondering if Konjac will give a clear look and has the same feel as Carbomer?

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  17. Hey there ST - You may just love konjac glucomannan - it is very close. I did a comparative of konjac to crabber in this post: http://www.lisaliseblog.com/2012/05/konjac-glucomannan-vs-carbomer-whos.html

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  18. Carbomer! not Crabber (silly autocorrect!)

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  19. Thank you for this info. I am looking to find what carbomer is. I am making a face cream using aloe vera gel gelled with carbomer. I wasn't sure back then if it is suitable for vegan. I guess it is.

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  20. HI SoakandLather - yes, carbomer is vegan friendly :)

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  21. Hi, thanks for your info here.
    I have been prescribed eye gel that contains carbomer and have really bad itching that only gets worse. I was looking for info about the ingredients and came across your blog. The gel also contains sorbitol (E 420), which seem to be totally uncalled for as it is a sweetener and I am obviously not going to eat the eye gel. Anyway, I can not say what substance is causing the itching, but I will have to stop using the product and I thought it could be useful for other people with similar problems. As you say, info about carbomer is suspiciously scarce.

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  22. HI Damina, Thanks for your input. I'm sorry to hear you are among problems with your eye gel. Carbomer has been used in cosmetics for a very long time with very very few adverse reactions, which makes it an obvious industry favourite as it is also quite functional.

    The addition of sorbitol in your gel is as a humectant. The company could just as well have used glycerine - the 2 function just the same in skincare products. You are correct in that they are indeed both sweeteners. Glycerine and Sorbitol are both multifunctional ingredients and are used in food, cosmetics and pharmaceutical industries. I hope you find some relief from your itchiness!

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  23. Arghh! Please excuse the backwards sounding sentence (silly autocorrect). The first sentence is to read: I am sorry to hear you are having problems...

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  24. Thanks for your reply and yes autocorrect is annoying :)

    I am sure carbomer can be useful in skin products, but less sure about using it in eye products. I have used a different make of eye gel before without any problem, that does not contain either carbomer or sorbitol. This is why I can not be sure what ingredient is causing the itching. Although I should say, the leaflet states quite a few possible side effects without revealing which substance that could be the cause.

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  25. HI Damina - I hope you find the culprit ingredient!

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